Should I Fork A Repo?

Should I clone or fork?

If you don’t intend to make changes to code, clone but don’t fork.

Forking is intended to host the commits you make to code, while cloning is perfectly fine for copying the content and history of the project..

Can I see who cloned my repo?

Yes, the owner of a repository will see when someone makes a fork on Github, but no, they will not see it when someone makes a clone somewhere else.

What is difference between fork and clone?

When you fork a repository, you create a copy of the original repository (upstream repository) but the repository remains on your GitHub account. Whereas, when you clone a repository, the repository is copied on to your local machine with the help of Git.

What happens when you fork a repo?

What is a fork? A GitHub fork is a copy of a repository (repo) that sits in your account rather than the account from which you forked the data from. Once you have forked a repo, you own your forked copy. This means that you can edit the contents of your forked repository without impacting the parent repo.

How do I fork a repo to another repo?

Basically, the “fork and branch” workflow looks something like this:Fork a GitHub repository.Clone the forked repository to your local system.Add a Git remote for the original repository.Create a feature branch in which to place your changes.Make your changes to the new branch.Commit the changes to the branch.More items…•

Can I fork my own repo?

Although it is not possible to fork your own repo into the same account, it can be done into an self-owned Organization account, which can be easily created for free via the ‘+’ button. The main advantage of this option is that the new repo is a real fork of the original one, and not just a clone.